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Description:
This is a great example of completing diverting us from a more fundamental issue: the insanity of bottling regular water in the first place! The resources that go into creating a product that no one actually needs far outweighs any possible benefit from a bottle people will probably not recycle anyway..Plus, the tree is literally a cliche that should be legally banned from advertising that isnt about trees.
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RATINGS & COMMENTS

5.0bsh711’s
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Ugh. Trying to market "green bottled water" is like trying to market "healthy" cigarettes.

4.2Green-Rising-Marketing’s
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I don't think I'll ever buy on to the idea that bottled water is a green product. Also, I don't understand how the shape makes it eco, or uses less plastic - perhaps they make the plastic walls thinner? I know that there was a lawsuit from one bottled water company in FL against a municipality that highlighted their greenwashing claims and encouraged citizens to use their tap water...it's just crazy.Holly - www.greenrisingmarketing.com

2.8domenica’s
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I think that this add shows a step in the right direction

3.6redcarrie10’s
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What about what it takes to bottle the water. Cutting out such a small percentage of the bottle doesn't convince me of anything. It's a stretch for sure.

4.7MadameRoland’s
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Seriously? It's still a plastic bottle.

3.4lunchbreath’s
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the literal claims here are at least fairly accurate. the overall impression of an environmentally friendly industry is not. guess what, you don't have to buy bottled water, and it's a waste of your money. but if you're going to anyway, hey, maybe buy the one with less plastic.

3.4[email protected]’s
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I feel like producing a bottle with less plastic is a great start to making the company green. However, if Ozarka is not planning on changing other facets of their production and bottling, then I have to say that this claim will be misleading. According to the Food and Water Watch, bottled water production produces up to 1.5 million tons of plastic waste and requires 47 million gallons of oil per year. Over 80 percent of plastic water bottles are thrown away every year instead of being recycled. Unless Ozarka will be actively trying to change any of this data, their new "eco-friendly" water bottles will have a minute effect on the environment.

2.6[email protected]’s
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I think this is ads is just trying to get people to think that this bottle is green and actually is going to help the environment. They don’t tell the consumer that it is not really easy to recycle the cap on the bottle if at all possible. They also don’t include that people shouldn't liter with their bottles that could also cause a lot of damage. Instead of the tree hugging the person drinking they should have a recycling bend around so you can actually see the person doing the positive and desired behavior, which is recycling. The thing that I do find truthful is that they put emphasis on the fact that the bottle shape is going to actually bring little impact.

3.8stuttspromo’s
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The tree hugging the man drinking Ozarka is cute. I like that they provide additional examples of environmentally friendly activities, such as recycling and carpooling. The claim that Ozarka bottles use 30% less plastic than average half-liter plastic bottles nationally is interesting. Honestly, I am not sure how that works. I have additional questions concerning Ozarka’s commitment to having low impact on the environment. How do they power their equipment? Do they utilize solar energy? Do they make their bottles from recycled plastics? How much impact does extracting spring water have on the surrounding area? None of these questions are addressed in the ad, making it unclear just how “green†Ozarka is. While it is helpful to use less plastic, there are much more “green†ways to drink water. The ad also makes no mention of the fact that it is more environmentally sound to use refillable water bottles, because that would not be a wise business decision. Overall, I like that Ozarka has at least taken a baby step in the right direction. The ad itself is cute and non-threatening. However, the information left out does not leave me confident that Ozarka is going out of its way to take care of the environment.

1.4stuttspromo’s
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Within the past couple of years, Ozarka has introduced its new Eco-Shape bottles. These bottles require anywhere from 25% to 30% less plastic in their packaging [bottle]. Sizes include the .5L, 20oz, 1L, and 1.5L bottles. The ad above reflects this new relationship between Ozarka, the consumer, and nature. Greenwashing is “...when a company or organization spends more time and money claiming to be “green†through advertising and marketing than actually implementing business practices that minimize environmental impact.†Ozarka is one company that appears to be doing its part and the new Eco-Shape bottle is definitely another step in the right direction. Reducing plastic consumption is a concern for all companies as it is very harmful to the environment. Ozarka’s products are also 100% recyclable. Much of the recycling efforts put into the product, however, rely heavily on the consumer actually recycling. It is the end consumer that shapes the “green†environment; a demand for fully recyclable products forces companies to produce in this manner. Efforts to become “green†are otherwise just a marketing ploy to sell more widgets. As more and more companies embrace the idea of reducing waste, the question remains, “how far is the CONSUMER willing to go in the pursuit of more environmentally friendly practices?†– JM1647