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Description:
The problem with plastic is getting it recycled! Sure, it's great that this bottle uses 15% less plastic than other bottles*. Check the asterisk: it reads something like ".5L bottles across twelve cities. Over 130 different .5L bottles were weighed across the water soda juice and tea categories. On average the Eco-Shape bottle was found to be the lightest .5L bottle on the market containing 30% less plastic when compared to the average of other .5L bottles."Confused? I *think* I get what they're trying to say. The problem is the average consumer won't.If companies are going to try and be the good guy about this don't half-a$$ an ad-- tell us exactly what we're doing to mother earth.
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RATINGS & COMMENTS

4.4justindoak’s
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A reduction in plastic use is better, I'll give Nestle that for starting down the road of improvement, but this does not deserve an "eco" label. First, 100% of the material in this bottle is virgin/raw material - no post consumer. Here nestle is asking us to "please recycle", yet does not use recycled material in the bottle. For that, I give them a thumbs down. They should explore Ingeo plastics.

0.0illusio’s
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I'd be more into this bottle if it was made of biodegradable plastic.

3.4cfeong’s
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I agree with the rater who said that the only acceptable container would be one that is biodegradable. The water needed to make plastic to store water is unconscionable.

3.4greenguru’s
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There is absolutely nothing green about manufacturing virgin plastic containers, of any size, in order to carry a "product" that we can acquire simply by turning on a tap. Biodegradable plastic is not the answer either due to manufacturing impacts and the fact that our landfills do not permit biodegradation. Disposable water vessels of any size or material are bad. Reusable bottles are the only eco-solution for toting water.

4.2agmaynard’s
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There is nothing "fashionable" about disposable plastic water bottles...

5.0Mr. Sustainability’s
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Bottled water..green? Hahahahaha roflmao

3.8rl1186’s
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This advertisement featuring Nestle's Pure Life Natural Spring Water is decievingly "green". It claims that the new "Eco-Shape" bottle is made of 15% less plastic. This leads you to believe that Nestle's plastic bottles are enviromentally friendly, when the truth is that no plastic bottle is really enviromentally firendly. The ad continues to say "We can all make a difference" inferring that Nestle is making a positive "difference" to the enviroment. In my opinion they are just cutting costs to gain profit, disguising the change as "green". As far as inprovemnts, come up with a container that IS envirmentally friendly, such as bio-degradeable, or try and shift the way you distribute water to your customers. What ever happend those water taps that held giant refillable kegs on top. Like the ones from Sparkletts or Ozarka, that would deliver water to your house. It seems like those have been replaced by plastic bottles. If Nestle really wanted to make a difference they should try and phase out plasic bottles and switch to an alternative. The only way to improve the actual ad would be to maybe focus more on the product and not so much the green theme. This advertisement is too obvious in the way is uses greenwashing. Bottled water is not an enviromentally friendly product so they should trying to push it as one. If they insist on a green campaign, it is only right that they change the product to fit the claims.

3.6ktiegs’s
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Yes the bottle might be 15% less plastic, but what is that percentage compared too. Is it exactly 15%? And is that 15% enough? Also if the company is so "go green" why did they post an advertisement on a huge paper billboard?

2.8cb1443’s
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I gave this ad a medium greenwashing score because I see how the ad can be misleading but I do not think that Nestle is over doing it with this ad because they are just stating that the new bottles are supposedly 15% less plastic. They are not saying anything major about Nestle being a perfect eco-friendly company. I would recommend that Nestle give more proof that the bottles really are less plastic and not just a different shape.

2.0cxcuellar’s
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This ad shows green marketing by advertising their more environmentally-friendly water bottles.

1.2[email protected]’s
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Overall I believe Nestle Pure Life water has done a good job in avoiding greenwashing its product. Nestle Pure Life water bottles have a redesigned Eco-Shape that uses 15% less plastic in the production of the bottle. Since plastic in our landfills is a growing concern among many people, I gave Nestle Pure Life water bottle a low score for helping reduce the amount of plastic in landfills and garbage dumps. Also at the bottom of the ad is a message stating "Please Recycle." Urging people to recycle helps. This is another way Nestle Pure Life water bottles have helped the plastic waste problem.The Nestle Company has exhibited an excellent idea for reducing plastic consumption. My suggestions for the company are that they continue researching more innovated ways of reducing the amount of plastic used in making their water bottles. If they could reduce 15% of the plastic when making the bottle, who says they can't reduce 20% or even 25% of it. And finally, they should strive to be a leader in the Eco-Shape bottle and urge other bottle makers to follow in their efforts.

3.5JT’s
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The ad's claim is concrete and verifiable and, assuming it is accurate, is not in itself misleading. But the assertion that any kind of bottled water is eco-friendly -- whether the bottle is recycled or biodegradable or not -- is completely bogus. In addition to the energy required to produce and package the product, there is the much greater use of energy to transport the product thousands of miles, when studies have shown that bottled water is generally no better quality, and sometimes worse quality, than tap water. But perhaps the biggest problem that I have not seen mentioned in these reviews is the corporate commodification of a natural resource that is essential to life, making it less accessible to the communities from which it is taken.

3.0andrea’s
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My opinion is they use new matirial for this bottle, and that does not help much.